Radio? Seriously?

‘Radio? Seriously? I hear press is the next big thing too!’

LinkedIn provides many fascinating insights into what others think of what you do. This particular comment was made by a man who works in ‘paid search’ - an industry that didn’t exist 20 years ago, and therefore provides him with the self-aggrandising feeling that a) he works at the cutting edge of something, and b) any other media that’s been around for longer must be dying.

I’m a big fan of paid search. It’s brought much great content my way. It’s an effective and precise method for finding what I want.

I’m also a big fan of cutlery. It’s brought much great food my way. It’s an effective and precise method for putting it into my mouth.

However, my emotional connection is still very much with the content/food, rather than the search/cutlery. This fact doesn’t seem to have changed, even when I was introduced to the phenomenal modern concept of the ‘Spork’.

Great radio advertising creates messages that fit perfectly with the food, not the fork. Get the perfect tone, voice, and script, place it in the right show or daypart, and you can leverage the listener’s profound love of their favourite radio station for your brand. 

So, news for you, my LinkedIn contact of a contact. Radio’s not the next big thing. It’s the thing. It’s humour, it’s news, it’s music, it’s live, it’s changing, and it’s loved by a non-diminishing 90% of population. Hooking into that is a lot of fun.

That won’t change in the next ten years.

But paid search will. It will become screenless, as you use your voice to search and your ears to gather the information from your Amazon Echo or Google Home.

If only there was a blueprint for a method of delivering information in a perfectly judged / entertaining / informative manner using audio alone.

Oh, perhaps radio is the next big thing after all.